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UAS Magazine’s Geographic Luckiness

When our publishing team of writers, designers, marketers, executives and business developers first began our venture in the unmanned aircraft systems realm, we knew we had an unfair advantage over many others.
By Luke Geiver | May 28, 2015

When our publishing team of writers, designers, marketers, executives and business developers first began our venture in the unmanned aircraft systems realm, we knew we had an unfair advantage over many others. Our corporate headquarters are located in a place that is fast-becoming the apex for UAS development. From Grand Forks, North Dakota, we are minutes away from UAV flights of all sizes, types and applications. We try to frequent a test site and drive by the nation’s first commercial UAS business park every week. It may seem that our team has been lucky in our location, but it was in fact, part of the incentive to enter into this venture with such excitement. The UAS world is literally at our fingertips, and for a team of content producers and blossoming industry experts, having information at our fingertips when we are sitting at the computer keyboard is incredibly powerful and valuable.

I’ve written about the “luckiness” of our team and its location in the global UAS landscape before, but I couldn’t get it off my mind this week after much of it was spent conversing face-to-face with individuals including but not limited to: a U.S. Senator Chief of Staff, UAS Tech park developers, UAS insider experts and others. Make no mistake, we cover UAS happenings and produce content related to every inch of North America and beyond, it just so happens that some weeks (this one included) it seems as if we are a community-based magazine. For the UAS world looking to learn about new transactions, developments and trends, that is a good thing. The proof will come from future stories.

What might be more exciting for our team (sorry North Dakota) is that the UAS landscape is expanding at an impressive pace—from 333’s, to COA’s, to mainstream end-users adding UAVS to day-to-day operations—all across the country. We are lucky to be a part of the type of industry that keeps us constantly astounded to the point that our significant others have simply become accustomed to us coming home at night and skipping the To-Do list conversations for updates on cool new technology offerings or yet another no-brainer application for UAVs from 200 to 20,000 feet. When or if you come to North Dakota for UAS, just remember we are there, right at one of the budding epicenters of UAS activity. But, don’t forget, because we are based in North Dakota, we are used to traveling.