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The UAS Fourth of July Conversation

There is no better topic to discuss around the picnic table this Fourth of July then that of unmanned aircraft systems because of this story.
By Luke Geiver | July 02, 2015

There is no better topic to discuss around the picnic table this Fourth of July then that of unmanned aircraft systems. The innovation and undeniable benefits of UAV use to so many people in so many places is exciting and worth sharing. Of course, like most things, there will be a few naysayers and misinformed thinkers around the table that push the conversation on UAVs into a negative light. Before you go visit with friends or family this Holiday, keep in mind which conversations may come up and how you might respond.

For those that infer UAVs, UAS’ or drones are only used for weaponized and spying purposes, remind them of the story we posted this week about Ghana. When a group of aerospace experts were approached about helping the Republic of Ghana get medicine to remote areas (Ghana is the size of Oregon with a population of 28 million people) and they brought up the idea of using UAVs to get the vaccines or test results from point A to point B, the Ghana officials responded with hesitancy for using UAVs for the project. The officials believed only what they had heard before, that drones are used for military-specific purposes. Thankfully for the people of Ghana in remote places, their officials were able to learn and see how UAVs can help deliver time-sensitive packages in a matter of hours instead of a matter of weeks.

It’s these type of stories that are changing the conversation on UAS every day. Half way through the year, the U.S. already has more than 500 commercially operating UAS companies that are providing unique and basic services that may not seem to be on the same level as UAVs delivering temperature sensitive Ebola-specific medicine to the far reaches of a rural community ravaged by the disease, but they are changing the rhetoric about drones—rebranding the term in essence—so that when we talk about them with friends or family members around the picnic table, we aren’t down on the future of drones, but celebrating what’s to come.